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Diversity

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While the majority of U.S. farm operators are older white males, the American farmer is becoming more diverse than you might think. Dan Miyasako is a third-generation Japanese-American farmer in eastern Oregon, in a community of Japanese-American farmers. In California, Sikhs and Armenians grow raisins and new Hmong farmers raise produce, while in Orange County, New York, Korean-Americans are acquiring farmland. Since 1997, the number of African-American farmers has begun increasing again, after years of precipitous decline, and the number of women who are principal farm operators is increasing. While many long-time farmers see stagnation and become discouraged because they see no future in farming, new immigrants see opportunity and the promise of more success than they have realized at home.
Copyright
Edwin Remsberg
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3000x2000 / 4.9MB
While the majority of U.S. farm operators are older white males, the American farmer is becoming more diverse than you might think.  Dan Miyasako is a third-generation Japanese-American farmer in eastern Oregon, in a community of Japanese-American farmers.  In California, Sikhs and Armenians grow raisins and new Hmong farmers raise produce, while in Orange County, New York, Korean-Americans are acquiring farmland.  Since 1997, the number of African-American farmers has begun increasing again, after years of precipitous decline, and the number of women who are principal farm operators is increasing.  While many long-time farmers see stagnation and become discouraged because they see no future in farming, new immigrants see opportunity and the promise of more success than they have realized at home.